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Why are you collecting all this data?

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology and The Nature Conservancy use Habitat Network to collect several special kinds of data from project participants that it would otherwise be very difficult for us to collect without your help. For instance, we collect data about the way you are using the landscapes in your backyards, local parks, nature […]

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology and The Nature Conservancy use Habitat Network to collect several special kinds of data from project participants that it would otherwise be very difficult for us to collect without your help. For instance, we collect data about the way you are using the landscapes in your backyards, local parks, nature reserves, schools, and gardens. Much of this data is created when you draw your map; from your drawings we understand the location and size of each kind of habitat type available to birds and other wildlife. For some map elements we need additional information about the human practices or characteristics of that habitat, site or object that affect its potential to act as habitat. For instance, when you create a site, we ask about the use of pesticides on that site because we know that pesticides may impact not just insects, but humans and other wildlife as well.

Habitat Network uses the data we collect to answer scientific questions such as:

  1. What practices improve the wildlife value of residential landscapes?
  2. Which of these practices have the greatest impact?
  3. Over how large an area do we have to implement these practices to really make a difference?
  4. What impact do urban and suburban wildlife corridors and stopover habitats have on wildlife?
  5. Which measures (bird counts? nesting success?) show the greatest impacts of our practices?