Cookies, explained…

Photo © Kimberly Vardeman

Welcome to Habitat Network’s third-party cookie explanation. To skip our eloquent unpacking of this not-so-delicious cookie topic and go straight to managing your cookies on your preferred browser…

CLICK YOUR BROWSER BELOW (What’s My Browser?) FOR DETAILED COOKIE MANAGEMENT INSTRUCTIONS
Edge on Windows 10
Chrome on Windows
Firefox on Windows
Firefox on a Mac
Chrome on a Mac
Safari

…or keep reading to learn more.

What is the deal with third-party cookies and Habitat Network?

When you visit a particular webpage that page often gives you a first-party cookie, or a small text file that is stored locally on your computer in a file associated with whichever browser you are using. The small text file gives the webpage a way to recognize who you are on the webpage and what your preferences are. You can imagine this is very helpful for making a webpage work (it allows the page to know what to display back to you based on who you are). First-party cookies are common and are not causing problems for users on Habitat Network.

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Photo © Mark Kens

What is causing a problem are what is known as third-party cookies?

Third-party cookies often provide services to you, such as the ability to read a twitter feed (third-party) on a blog (first-party), or when you use your gmail address to sign-in to a new website and it magically knows what your username is. Third-party cookies have also been used in obnoxious ways too, which is how they have gotten a bad rap for invading people’s privacy. The most commonly cited instance of these negative uses is when a shopping website becomes a “third-party” on other websites you are visiting and displays their ads to you through that unrelated website.

1st Party, 3rd Party, what about 2nd party?


YOU are the “2nd party” at this cookie party. When you visit a website it is essentially an interaction between two entities: the first entity (or “first-party”) is the website itself and the second entity (or “second-party”) is the website user, or you. A third entity (or third-party) comes into the picture when an outside website also interacts with you through the first website.
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Is Habitat Network using third-party cookies to serve me ads?

No, we use third-party cookies because Habitat Network is a complicated website with a lot of different parts. Sometimes it is easier for us to host these different parts on different web domains (think urls). So, in order for the part of the website hosted at api.yardmap.org to send information to the part of the website hosted at birds.cornell.edu we use cookies. Because your browser sees those cookies as coming from a domain that is different than the one it is displaying, it interprets these as “third-party” even though they are all technically hosted by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. But, because your browser doesn’t know that, it will block them as third-party cookies if you have adware or internal security that asks the browser to block those third-party cookies.

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Photo © Danny Oosterveer

So, what do I do?

First, good for you for watching out for your cyber-privacy, jokingly portrayed above. All you have to do to use HN is turn off blocking for third-party cookies on our website so you can use it without running into fatal errors where data hosted in one place fails to pass through another one of our domains and save. We’ll show you, but you’ll need to know a little bit about what browser you are using because the instructions are specific to each browser.

Now for the fun part, let’s change your cookie settings…

CLICK YOUR BROWSER BELOW (What’s My Browser?) FOR DETAILED COOKIE MANAGEMENT INSTRUCTIONS
Edge on Windows 10
Chrome on Windows
Firefox on Windows
Firefox on a Mac
Chrome on a Mac
Safari

Edge on Windows 10

Allow Specific Third-Party Cookie Exceptions

***Microsoft EDGE does not have the option to allow third-party cookie exceptions***

Allow ALL 3rd party cookies

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In the top right corner, click the three dots to open the menu, then select “Settings” from the list.

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Scroll down to the bottom of the settings menu and click the “View Advanced Settings” button.

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Scroll down in the Advanced Settings menu to the Cookies section. From the drop-down menu, select “Don’t Block Cookies”. Restart the Edge browser for changes to take effect.

To check your extensions that block ads, use this link from Box Community as a resource.

Chrome on Windows

Allow Specific Third-Party Cookie Exceptions

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In the top right corner, click the three dots to open the menu, then select “Settings” from the list.

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Scroll down to the bottom of the settings page and click the “Advanced” button.

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Continue scrolling down and click on the “Content Settings” section.

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Select “Cookies”. This will open a new menu which will allow you to manage third-party cookies.

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Make sure the setting for “Allow sites to save and read cookie data (recommended)” is turned on.
Make sure the setting for “Block third-party cookies” is turned on, then click the ADD button to add exceptions to this security that will allow your browser to navigate Habitat Network.

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In the box that appears, type in these URLs one at a time and click ADD (these are the minimum allowances you need to run our application). You will see these URLs in the list after each add.

  • api.yardmap.org
  • api.birds.cornell.edu
  • app.yardmap.org

Close the settings window, the settings are saved automatically.

Allow ALL 3rd party cookies

WinChrome_1

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In the top right corner, click the three dots to open the menu, then select “Settings” from the list.

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Scroll down to the bottom of the settings page and click the “Advanced” button.

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Continue scrolling down and click on the “Content Settings” section.

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Select “Cookies”. This will open a new menu which will allow you to manage third-party cookies.

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Make sure the setting for “Allow sites to save and read cookie data (recommended)” is turned on.
Make sure the setting for “Block third-party cookies” is turned off. This will allow your browser to use third-party cookies to navigate Habitat Network.

To check your extensions that block ads, use this link from Box Community as a resource.

Firefox on Windows

Allow Specific Third-Party Cookie Exceptions

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Click on the “Options” button along the bottom of the browser window.

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Click on the privacy button along the sidebar menu.

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Under “History” select “Use Custom settings for History”. Make sure to check the “Allow cookies from sites” box but then select “Never” from the dropdown menu for “Accept third-party cookies”. Then click on the “Exceptions…” button.

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In the box that appears, type in these URLs one at a time and click “Allow” (these are the minimum allowances you need to run our application). You will see these URLs in the list after each add.

  • api.yardmap.org
  • api.birds.cornell.edu
  • app.yardmap.org

Close the window, the settings are saved automatically.

Allow ALL 3rd party cookies

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Click on the “Options” button along the bottom of the browser window.

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Click on the privacy button along the sidebar menu.

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Under “History” select “Use Custom settings for History”.Make sure to check the “Allow cookies from sites” box and then select “Always” from the dropdown menu for “Accept third-party cookies”
Close the browser window, the setting are saved automatically.

To check your extensions that block ads, use this link from Box Community as a resource.

Firefox on a Mac

To allow specific cookie exceptions follow these steps:

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Open the menu icon (the three lines stacked on top of one another) to the right of the search bar. Click on “Preferences”.

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A new browser window will open. Select “Privacy & Security”.

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Scroll down to “Cookies and Site Data” and select the “Exceptions” box.

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Please type in these URLs (which are the minimum you need to run our application)and select “Allow”:

  • api.yardmap.org
  • api.birds.cornell.edu
  • app.yardmap.org

Allow ALL 3rd party cookies

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Open the menu icon (the three lines stacked on top of one another) to the right of the search bar. Click on “Preferences”.

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A new browser window will open. Select “Privacy & Security”.

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Select “Accept cookies and site data from websites (recommended)”. And make sure “Always” is select for “Accept third-party cookies and site data”.

To check your extensions that block ads, use this link from Box Community as a resource.

Chrome on a Mac

To allow specific cookie exceptions follow these steps:

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Open your browser settings, the easiest is to click on the vertical (…) to the right of the search bar. Click “more tools” and “clear browsing data”.

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This window will pop-up. You can close it out or “cancel” it.

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Scroll down to “Content Settings”.

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Select “Cookies”.

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Scroll down to “Allow”, and select “Add”. This window will open-up. Please type in these URLs, which are the minimum you need to run our application:

  • api.yardmap.org
  • api.birds.cornell.edu
  • app.yardmap.org
  • Allow ALL 3rd party cookies

    Screen Shot 2018-07-11 at 1.43.49 PM

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    Open your browser settings, the easiest is to click on the vertical (…) to the right of the search bar. Click “more tools” and “clear browsing data”.

    Screen Shot 2018-07-11 at 1.44.14 PM

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    This window will pop-up. You can close it out or “cancel” it.

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    Scroll down to “Content Settings”.

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    Select “Cookies”.

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    Make sure you have selected (as depicted), “Allow sites to save and read cookie data (recommended)”, AND, turn off “Block third-party cookies”.

    To check your extensions that block ads, use this link from Box Community as a resource.

    Safari

    To allow specific cookie exceptions, follow these steps:

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    From the toolbar, select “Safari” and click on “Preferences”.

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    Select “Privacy”.

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    Select “Manage Website Data”.

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    Please type in these URLs, which are the minimum you need to run our application and select “Done”.

    • api.yardmap.org
    • api.birds.cornell.edu
    • app.yardmap.org

    Allow ALL 3rd party cookies

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    Go to the toolbar and select “Safari” and click on “Preferences”.

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    Select “Privacy”.

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    Make sure “Always allow” is selected.

    To check your extensions that block ads, use this link from Box Community as a resource.

    An option for getting around the third-party problem…JUNK BROWSER

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    Photo © Simon Jobling

    Some of our cyber-privacy cautious colleagues use what they call a junk browser. Similar to a junk email, this is a browser where you allow ALL third-party cookies, but don’t do personal stuff like banking, emailing, or shopping. This provides a level of privacy for those activities you do online that you are concerned might be tracked or involve your personal information. For example, let’s say you like Safari for ease of use, so you use Safari to pay your bills, check your bank statement, maybe browse social media, etc. Consider using Firefox for your internet surfing or engaging in inspiring citizen-science projects like Habitat Network! On this junk browser you can use fake names and only use your junk email to help keep yourself more anonymous.

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