Get to Know Your Habitat Neighbors

Photo © Devan King

We are all in this together. Creating habitat on the individual household level is powerful. Connecting habitats in neighborhoods, counties, and geographic regions is essential in creating viable habitat patches and corridors for wildlife.

The Brightside Organization, The Nature Conservancy, UPS and Brown-Forman partnered to plant 150 trees along West Broadway from 20th Street to the end at Shawnee Park in Louisville, Kentucky.

Photo © Devan King

Habitat Network provides a platform where people’s efforts to support wildlife through habitat changes, big and small, can be shared with researchers and others. Seeing how people around you are working towards this goal is powerful motivation to join the effort. With this in mind, we are encouraging you to get to know the habitat crusaders around you, and their properties.

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Feel free to leave a comment too in the “Recent Activity” section in the Overview!

To quickly and easily accomplish this task; while looking at your map, zoom out. Go slowly, depending on where you live there may be several maps close by. Or, you may have to zoom-out several counties to find another map to explore.

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When you find another map, take note of what habitat features are present. Are they the same as yours? Or, are you providing different resources for wildlife? Perhaps your sites are complementary because you have a water feature and a few bird feeders while your neighbor has a snag and several large native trees and shrubs–collectively you are providing food, water, shelter and nesting habitat. (Duplicate habitat features are beneficial, if you have the room. If not, working with your neighbors is encouraged.) Go habitat team!

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We recommend exploring at least ten maps. Some of the maps may be more or less complete than others. Don’t be discouraged. Instead, consider reaching out to this Habitat Network user and see if they had difficulties mapping, maybe you can help? Remember we are all in this together. Leaving them a comment is a great way to reach out. If they haven’t changed their settings they should receive a follow-up email letting them know you’ve left a comment.

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Other ideas to engage your neighbors? Leave an encouraging comment on their map. Ask them a question about their land management choices. Maybe start a Group using our Groups Tool and invite them to join.

The Brightside Organization, The Nature Conservancy, UPS and Brown-Forman partnered to plant 150 trees along West Broadway from 20th Street to the end at Shawnee Park in Louisville, Kentucky.

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We have a lot to learn from each other. You and your ten other neighbors are self-selected citizen-scientists participating in this important movement to reimagine our landscapes for wildlife. You are the Habitat Network. Citizen-scientists UNITE!

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