Search Results for: native plants


Which Birds, Which Plants?

Discover exactly which plants to add to your yard, based on the birds you want to attract.

Abundant Plants, Abundant Wildlife

Increasing the area covered by plants in your yard or community has many benefits for you and wildlife. This is a foundational theme in our work at Habitat Network where we consistently advocate for more areas to be landscaped with plant-life to increase access for wildlife, like this Monarch caterpillar enjoying Whorled Milkweed (Asclepias verticillata) in a native flower bed.

Native Trees and Shrubs

Trees and shrubs play important roles in ecosystems. They are necessary components of the mid and overstory layers of vegetative environments providing food, shelter, and nesting habitat for wildlife.


Get to Know the Plants in Your Yard with These Plant ID Tips

Pant ID can be difficult but these tips will give you the resources you need to get to know the all of plants in your gardens.


Installing and Maintaining a Native Lawn

Have you had enough of all the mowing, watering, and chemical applications needed to keep your traditional turf short, green, and weed free? Are you interested in improving your yard to provide habitat for birds and other wildlife but still want to keep a grassy open area for recreation? Perhaps it is time to go […]

Design Advice

Native Lawn FTW! (For The Win)

If you've fought the lawn and the lawn won, let this inspire you to make a come back.

Native Grasses for Your Native Lawn

There are many factors to consider when choosing native grasses. Let this guide help you decide.

Healthy Ecosystems

Native Flowerbeds

Flowering plants are foundational in the understory of a structurally diverse habitat. Their role is multifaceted–as sources of food for pollinators, caterpillars, birds, and other herbivores, to create aesthetic appeal, and as homes for ecologically important fauna like predatory insects. Without flowering plants these crucial ecological relationships would collapse, changing the nature of the site, and its potential ecosystem services dramatically. This is true especially for native flowers.